doctor06
Jul 16, 2017

Taurine

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Posted on October 17, 2012

 

Taurine is an amino acid widely distributed in human tissues, and a major constituent of bile that can be found in the large intestine. Taurine occurs naturally in food, especially in seafood and meat. This ammino acid has many fundamental biological roles such as anti-oxidant, cell membrane stabilizer and modulation of calcium signaling. It is essential for cardiovascular function and development, and also skeletal muscle function. Taurine also functions in  the retina and the central nervous system. In addition, it has been shown to be effective in removing fatty liver deposits in rats, preventing liver disease and reducing  cirrhosis in the tested animals. There is also evidence that taurine is beneficial for healthy blood pressure and possibly, the alleviation of other cardiovascular ailments. In those suffering essential hypertension, taurine supplementation resulted in measurable decreases in blood pressure. Taurine is an anti-epileptic and anti-arrhythmic agent, and protects the brain from over-excitation and the heart from ischemic damage. It is often used to improve exercise performance because of its involvement in energy storage and cardiac function.  For diabetics, taurine may lower blood glucose and reduce the need for insulin therapy according to the Office of Dietary Supplements. 

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